Hair Extensions Beulah

Hair extensions might seem like a new invention but in reality hair additions have been around as far back as the Egyptian times when both men and women work wigs. Since then hair pieces have been in and out of fashion ever since.

hair extensions on really short hair

In 1800 fake hair was frowned upon and women left their hair to be natural until the Romantic era was in full swing when women wore elaborate Apollo knots. Come the mid Victorian era and hair pieces were used a lot more extensively. Then strangely in the early 20th century Edwardian women wore false hair additions to create the pompadour hairstyle which looked like a woman was wearing a teapot on her head. How that became fashionable I don’t really know!

Around the 1920’s less hair was the big thing so hair pieces took a dive around that time and it wasn’t until the 1940s when long hair came back into fashion and women starting indulging again. Then in the 1960’s big hair was back with a vengeance. Coils were the in thing or the updo as better known to us were seen of many women, this was created by very extravagant human hair pieces.  Beulah Wigs made from real or fake hair were commonly worn around this time too and carried on into the early 70’s. Come the 80’s and big hair was in but only natural hair. Famous singers wore wigs but that was about it.

hair extensions weft

Human Hair Extensions

Clip-in hair extensions are the new rave this year with more and more women becoming health conscious and throwing away the hair glue (which can cause alopecia, bald spots and breakage) and tending towards hair extensions - which not only cause no damage whatsoever but last 10x longer (normally approx 12 months). Not all companies use high quality hair - but most do use a hair type known as Remy. Remy hair is luxurious human hair and doesn't have one trace of synthetic materials - they are also softer.

Synthetic hair is "played-out" women these days want to treat hair extensions like their own hair - and luckily for the human hair extensions can be:

  • washed
  • heat styled
  • dyed
  • cut
  • curled and much more

Purchase from companies that sell Remy hair but be careful not to get ripped off - a lot of the celebrity endorsed hair extensions use their names to fool customers but for example a full head (7 - 8 rows) and black 18" Remy hair should only set you back £25-£30 and not a pound more. Some companies sell theirs for £149.99 - be smart and know what you are doing.

European hair is for the Caucasian and Asian women, where as black/afro Caribbean women should buy Yaki hair as this matches their texture and blends in well especially with the women who relax (chemically straighten) their hair.

Half head or full head?

A half head is for the ladies who already have a bit of length and thickness in their own hair and just want a few pieces to add bulk and a bit of length (normally at the back). Ladies who buy half head hair extensions would preferably have layers (you don't want a mullet) and want less than obvious hair extensions

A full head is for women of any length hair who want length and also thickness. These will change your whole look and if your lucky enough to shop with us you will get double weft; most companies will use single wefts (so that means your hair will be thinner and you might need to buy more)

Overall clip-in extensions are clearly the best things since sliced bread! Enjoy them and the confidence they bring. Not only can they be used for nightwear you can wear them to school or to work and as long as you treat them well, they can really boost your personal appearance. We promise you that you won't even want to take them out once you become used to them!

The History of Beulah

It can be difficult to find a hair extension stylist near you, and you don't always have the time to drive hours to get your hair done. Luckily, several online resources are available to help.

Here is a helpful, condensed list:

The Hair Extension Salon Locator

This site lists hair extension salons by state. It also features articles on the care of hair extensions and hair loss information. Additionally, they have supplies and training resources.

HairBonz

This is the website for the HairBonz hair extension system. You can call 1-888-693-HAIR to find a listing of hair extension salons using the HairBonz system.

Hair Boutique

This informative site has links to hair extension salons. Unfortunately, the information is listed alphabetically and cannot be searched by city or state. However, if you have the patience to scan the listings you just might find a local salon.

Black Beauty Care Directory

This site is specifically for African-American beauty concerns, and lists salons that cater to African hair. Information is categorized by state for easy access.

Another way to find a local hair extension salon is to type "Houston hair extension salons" or "hair extensive salons near Houston" in a search engine. Of course, use your own city name in place of Houston!

You can also use your Yellow Pages to find hair extension salons.

One of the best ways to find a top-quality salon is by word of mouth. If a friend or family member has beautiful extensions, ask for a reference.

No matter where you located your hair extension salon, make sure that your stylist is qualified to apply the extensions. He or she should be a licensed cosmetologist with ample experience in applying the type of extensions you are considering. Many experts recommend that you meet some of the stylist's other clients and find out if they are happy with their extensions. At the very least, ask to see a portfolio with before and after pictures.

The History of Hair Extensions

Hair extensions started being used in the 1980s, but because of poor results and high expense, were abandoned until about 5 years ago. Their popularity has been boosted by all the celebrities who now use them.

What are hair extensions?
Hair extensions are hairpieces that can be attached to your natural hair or scalp; they enhance the thickness of your hair or the length. There are several kinds, but the most popular ones are

· Strands, small clusters of about 30 pieces of hair

· Wefts, slightly larger curtains of hair, joined at the top and free flowing at the ends. The best wefts are hand-made, not machine-made.

· Braids and dreadlocks, which are pre-wound.

Some are synthetic and some are made of human hair. The natural hair of Caucasians is different from that of Asians or Afro-Caribbeans and you should choose an extension that will match your own hair.

They come in many varieties and can be pre-colored, pre-highlighted or pre-permed with curls or a body wave. Depending on how it was attached, you may need to have your hair extension re-done after 6 or 8 weeks, or it might last up to 4 months. Re-attaching will always be periodically necessary because our natural hair continues to grow, the bonding agent becomes loose, life happens, and you'll need to re-adjust and refresh your hair's appearance.

How are hair extensions attached?

· Strands are woven, glued, or clipped to your natural hair. If they're clipped, you can take them off easily any time. If they're glued, various bonding agents may be used and care must be taken to protect your scalp and natural hair.

· For wefts, your stylist will make a small corn row or weave in your natural hair, and sew the weft to this weave. This method uses no chemicals.

· Braids are usually woven in with your own hair and again no chemicals are used.

What kind of hair extension would best suit me?
That's a very personal matter and should be decided between you and your stylist. There are extensions for every kind of hair, even thin and baby-fine hair. Your stylist will assess your hair type, discuss how you would like to look and whether it's possible given your particular circumstances and hair status, and explain alternatives. When an extension is decided upon, she will personally customize it to match your hair, will attach it, explain how she's doing it, and give you information on how to care for it.

How do I care for my hair extension?

· Hair extensions can be shampooed, styled and brushed the same as your natural hair, but don't try to alter their color. This should be professionally done.

· The most important thing is to be gentle with it so as to preserve the bond attaching it.

· Use a soft bristle brush and brush out tangles from the bottom ends up towards your head.

· At night, to avoid matting, tie it up or braid it if it's fairly long, and never sleep with wet or damp hair.

· Avoid using any silicone-based products or conditioners on the extension where it is bonded to your natural hair, as this will make the extension slip off.

Does it hurt to get a hair extension?
No, not when it's properly done. In the first day or two it will feel a little heavy perhaps, and this added weight on your head may feel slightly uncomfortable until you get used to it. The process of attaching it should not hurt at all. If it does, something isn't right. Sometimes if the cornrow method is being used, the weaving might be done too tightly, pulling too hard on your scalp. This can even cause headaches. But you should not accept this. The weaving doesn't have to be so tight that it's painful.

You may come across stories of how a person's hair was broken, burned, or otherwise damaged by their hair extension. The odds are that this person had it done by an untrained stylist, or one with little experience.

Do your homework

Since the demand for hair extensions is growing, more varieties will become available and research will give us more methods of creating and using them. The hair styling industry is not regulated, so do some checking and reading. Many websites recount personal experiences and have Frequently Asked Question pages.

Choose a stylist with training specifically in hair extensions, and with plenty of experience using them. Ask to speak to other clients who have purchased hair extensions, to hear what their experiences were like.


Victoria Clip In Hair Extensions

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